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Archive for September, 2017

Review of the Spatial Reserves Exercises

September 26, 2017 Leave a comment

We’re currently reviewing the exercises that were developed to illustrate some of the issues discussed in the GIS Guide to Public Domain Data publication and here on the Spatial Reserves blog, with the intention of releasing an updated set of exercises next year. The proposed style and format of the updated exercises is the subject of my dissertation as part of a M.Sc. in Digital Education at the University of Edinburgh.

Here’s where you can help …  I’m looking for volunteers to review a presentation on two exercises and complete four short questionnaires. This should only take 10-15 minutes of your time.

The study is available at Digital Education – Multi-media study

Thanks in advance,

Jill C.

 

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Era of Big Data is Here: But Caution Is Needed

September 25, 2017 Leave a comment

As this blog and our book are focused on geospatial data, it makes sense that we discuss trends in data–such as laws, standards, attitudes, and tools that gradually helping more users to more quickly find the data that they need.  But with all of these advancements we continue to implore decision makers to think carefully about and investigate the data sources they are using.  This becomes especially critical–and at times difficult–when that data is in the “big data” category.  The difficulty arises when big data is seen as so complex that often it is cited and used in an unquestioned manner.

Equally challenging and at times troublesome is when the algorithms based on that data are unchallenged, and when access to those algorithms are blocked to those who seek to understand who created them and what data and formulas they are based on.  As these data and algorithms increasingly affect our everyday lives, this can become a major concern, as explained in data scientist Cathy O’Neil’s TED talk,  who says “the era of blind faith in big data must end.”

In addition, the ability to gain information from mapping social media is amazing and has potential to help in so many sectors of society.  This was clearly evident with the usefulness of social media posts that emergency managers in Texas and Florida USA mapped during the August-September 2017 hurricanes there.  However, with mapping social media comes an equal if not greater need for caution, as this article that points out the limitations of such data for understanding health and mitigating the flu.  And from a marketing standpoint, Paul Goad cautioned here against relying on data alone.

It is easy to overlook an important point in all this discussion on data, big data, and data science. We tend to refer to these phenomena in abstract terms but these data largely represent us – our lives, our habits, our shopping preferences, our choice of route on the way to work, the companies and organisations we work for and so on. Perhaps less data and data science and more humanity and humanity science.  As Eric Schmidt, CEO of Google, has said, “We must remember that technology remains a tool of humanity.  How can we, and corporate giants, then use these big data archives as a tool to serve humanity?”

Understanding your data

Use caution in making decisions from data–even if you’re using “Big Data” and algorithms derived from it.    Photograph by Joseph Kerski. 

Categories: Public Domain Data

Ethics in Geospatial Decision-Making

September 11, 2017 Leave a comment

Our book and this blog frequently focus on the importance of making wise decisions when using geospatial data.  We often discuss the two-edged sword in which we are living with regard to the modern GIS era:  ‘Tis wonderful to have a plethora of geospatial data services at our fingertips, many of which are in real time, many are capable of being visualized in 3-D, and many are updated and curated with regularity.  Coupled with these services are a variety of easy-to-use spatial analysis tools that come coupled with desktop and web-based GIS software platforms.  But with this availability of data and easy-to-use tools brings increasing likelihood that decisions will be made based on them without regard to the data’s sources, scales, update frequency, map projection, completeness of attributes, and other measures of quality.

Decisions are still in large part made by humans, and the human element has always been laden with ethical decisions, whether we realize it or not.  Adding to the ethical element is the fact that geospatial decisions involve land, which has economic but also personal and inherent value, and affects people who live on that land.  Geospatial decisions also affect the very air we breathe and water we drink.

How can we be more purposefully aware of ethical elements in our decisions based on geospatial data?  Some insightful chapters and articles will, I think, be of help.  One is the new chapter on Professional and Practical Ethics of GIS&T in the UCGIS GIS&T Body of Knowledge project by David DiBiase.  Another is a 7-Step guide to ethical decision-making, written in 1999 but still incredibly relevant.  I particularly like the tests that the author describes–the harm test, the publicity test, the defensibility test, the reversibility test, the colleague test, and the organization test.

Another excellent resource is Penn State’s ethics education resource for geospatial professionals, which lists interesting and pertinent case studies, codes of ethics, university course syllabi, and other resources.  In a recent article in Directions Magazine, Dr Diana S. Sinton explores how ethics can be integrated into geospatial education.   She advocates that ethics be threaded throughout even an introductory GIS course rather than be relegated to one lecture, as is often the case.

What are your thoughts regarding ethics in GIS?

jjk_question.PNGGeospatial decisions are ethical decisions as well.

Categories: Public Domain Data