Home > Public Domain Data > Era of Big Data is Here: But Caution Is Needed

Era of Big Data is Here: But Caution Is Needed

As this blog and our book are focused on geospatial data, it makes sense that we discuss trends in data–such as laws, standards, attitudes, and tools that gradually helping more users to more quickly find the data that they need.  But with all of these advancements we continue to implore decision makers to think carefully about and investigate the data sources they are using.  This becomes especially critical–and at times difficult–when that data is in the “big data” category.  The difficulty arises when big data is seen as so complex that often it is cited and used in an unquestioned manner.

Equally challenging and at times troublesome is when the algorithms based on that data are unchallenged, and when access to those algorithms are blocked to those who seek to understand who created them and what data and formulas they are based on.  As these data and algorithms increasingly affect our everyday lives, this can become a major concern, as explained in data scientist Cathy O’Neil’s TED talk,  who says “the era of blind faith in big data must end.”

In addition, the ability to gain information from mapping social media is amazing and has potential to help in so many sectors of society.  This was clearly evident with the usefulness of social media posts that emergency managers in Texas and Florida USA mapped during the August-September 2017 hurricanes there.  However, with mapping social media comes an equal if not greater need for caution, as this article that points out the limitations of such data for understanding health and mitigating the flu.  And from a marketing standpoint, Paul Goad cautioned here against relying on data alone.

It is easy to overlook an important point in all this discussion on data, big data, and data science. We tend to refer to these phenomena in abstract terms but these data largely represent us – our lives, our habits, our shopping preferences, our choice of route on the way to work, the companies and organisations we work for and so on. Perhaps less data and data science and more humanity and humanity science.  As Eric Schmidt, CEO of Google, has said, “We must remember that technology remains a tool of humanity.  How can we, and corporate giants, then use these big data archives as a tool to serve humanity?”

Understanding your data

Use caution in making decisions from data–even if you’re using “Big Data” and algorithms derived from it.    Photograph by Joseph Kerski. 

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Categories: Public Domain Data
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