Home > Public Domain Data > Possible Changes to NAIP Imagery Licensing Model

Possible Changes to NAIP Imagery Licensing Model

As this blog and our book make clear, the world of geospatial data is in a continual state of change.  Much of this change has been toward more data in the public domain, but sometimes, the change may move in the opposite direction. The National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) has been a source for aerial imagery in the USA since 2003 and has been in the public domain, available here.  But recently, the Farm Services Agency (FSA) has proposed to move the data model from the public domain to a licensing model.  The collection of this imagery has been under an innovative model wherein state governments and the federal government share the costs.

One reason for the proposed change is that the states have been $3.1 million short over the past several years, and FSA cannot continue “picking up the tab.”  Furthermore, delays in releasing funding from cost-share partners forces contract awards past “peak agriculture growth” season, which thwarts one key reason why the imagery is collected in the first place–to assess agricultural health and practices.  We have discussed this aspect of geospatial data frequently in this blog–that geospatial data comes at a cost.  Someone has to pay, and sometimes, those payment models need to be re-considered with changing funding and priorities.  In this case, agencies and data analysts that rely on NAIP imagery would suffer adverse consequences, but with the expansion of the types and means by which imagery can be acquired nowadays, perhaps these developments will enable those other sources to be explored more fully.  And, possibly, the model could be adjusted so that the data could be paid for and that all could benefit from it.

For more information, see the report by our colleagues at GIS Lounge, and the presentation housed on the FGDC site, here.

Two samples of NAIP imagery, for Texas, left, and North Dakota, right.

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