Home > Public Domain Data > Historical Imagery for the entire world now available via Wayback Service in ArcGIS from Esri

Historical Imagery for the entire world now available via Wayback Service in ArcGIS from Esri

I know that many of you regularly want to examine changes-over-space-and-time with imagery and GIS for research or instruction purposes.   As of last week, 81 different dates of historical imagery for the past 5 years now reside in ArcGIS via the World Imagery Wayback service.   For more information, see: https://www.esri.com/arcgis-blog/products/arcgis-living-atlas/imagery/wayback-81-flavors-of-world-imagery/

You can access this imagery in ArcGIS Online, ArcMap, and ArcGIS Pro.  A great place to start is the World Imagery Wayback app – just by using a web browser  – https://livingatlas.arcgis.com/wayback/    A fascinating and an incredible resource for examining land use and land cover change, changes in water levels of reservoirs, coastal erosion, deforestation, regrowth, urbanization, and much more.  This resource covers the entire globe.

However, in keeping with the theme of our book The GIS Guide to Public Domain Data and this blog of being critical of the data, caution is needed.  The dates represent the update of the Esri World Imagery service.  This service is fed by multiple sources, private and public, from local and global sources.  Thus, the date does not mean that every location that you examine on the image is current as of that date.  I verified this in several locations where my ground observations in my local area show construction as of June 2018, for example, but that construction does not appear on the image.  In addition, several other places I examined from wintertime in the Northern Hemisphere were clearly “leaf-on” and taken during the summer before, or even from the summer before that.  Therefore, as always, know what you are working with.  Despite these cautions, the imagery still represents an amazing and useful resource.

wayback1wayback2

Sample from this imagery set for 30 July 2014 (top) and four years later, 27 June 2018 (bottom) for an area outside Denver, Colorado USA. 

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  1. July 6, 2018 at 2:28 pm

    Very useful application for GIS users looking at how land has changed over the years.

    • josephkerski
      July 25, 2018 at 2:33 pm

      Tis indeed truly amazing.

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