Home > Public Domain Data > A graphical aid in deciding whether geospatial data meets your needs

A graphical aid in deciding whether geospatial data meets your needs

The following graphic from an Esri course may be helpful when you are deciding whether or not you should use a specific GIS data set in your analysis.  Though simple, it contains several key elements in deciding fitness for use, a key topic in our blog and book, including metadata, scale, and currency.

Another helpful graphic and essay I have found helpful is Nathan Heazlewood’s 30 checks for data errors.  Another dated though useful set of text and graphic is from the people at PBCGIS here, where they review the process from abstraction of a situation of a problem, to considering the data model, fitness of data, understanding information needs, and examining the dichotomies of concise vs. confusing, credible vs. unfounded, and useful vs. not useful.  PBCGIS created a more detailed and useful set of considerations here.  My article published in Directions Magazine about search strategies might also be helpful.

Do you use graphical aids when making decisions about data, or when teaching this topic to others? If so, which are the most useful for you?

decision_tree_graphic_on_how_to_use_data

Advertisements
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: