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Latitude Mark II: All change and no change

April 18, 2017 2 comments

A recent article on BusinessInsider reported the re-launch of Google’s location sharing feature as an update to Google Maps. Originally available as Google Latitude, the first version prompted a report highlighting the risks of inadvertently sharing personal location information. Although the location sharing options seem similar second time around, the focus seems to be on the benefits of sharing this type of information and as the article notes, although the privacy concerns haven’t away, they are a footnote rather than the headline.

What has changed in the intervening years appears to be the perceptions about sharing personal location information. Is this because consumers of such services heeded the warnings and shared with discretion so fears were unfounded, or because the risks were not as great as originally thought? Other location sharing applications, such as Glympse and Swarm, stayed the course and developed their niche products away from the spotlight that tends to focus on Google. Have these services paved the way for Google to try again? Whatever the reason, Google is confident enough of a favourable reception to re-release their location sharing technology as part of their flagship application.

 

Lasers: The future of data capture and transmission?

December 12, 2016 Leave a comment

Over the last four years we have discussed some of the many challenges posed by the volume of data now available online – issues of quality, determining provenance, privacy, identifying the most appropriate source for particular requirements and so on. Being overwhelmed by the choice of data available or not always knowing what resources are available or where to start looking have been common responses from geospatial students and practitioners alike.

A recent report from the BBC on laser technology highlighted some current and future applications that have or will transform geospatial data capture, including the use of LiDAR and ultra precise atom interferometers that could be used to develop alternate navigation systems that do not rely on GPS. The article also discusses the inherent limitations of our current electronics-based computing infrastructure and the potential of silicon photonics, firing lasers down optical fibres, to help meet the demand for instant or near-instant access to data in the Internet-of-Everything world. If many feel overwhelmed now by the volumes of data available, what will technologies like silicon photonics mean for data practitioners in the future? Just because data may be available at unprecedented speeds and accessed more easily, that alone doesn’t guarantee the quality of the data will be any better or negate current concerns with respect to issues such as locational privacy. A critical understanding of these issues will be even more important if we are to make the most of these advances in digital data capture and transmission.

Public Domain Data Resources Page from Esri Press

October 3, 2016 Leave a comment

Esri Press have now published a new resources page to compliment The GIS Guide to Public Domain Data, cataloguing a list of blog posts from Spatial Reserves that update and augment many of the themes discussed in the book.

sr_resources

The resources site also provides information on accessing the hands-on exercises that accompany the book. The exercises provide an opportunity for novice and experienced data users alike to work through some of the issues discussed in the book.

 

OpenAddresses: A global address collection

September 20, 2016 1 comment

An integral part of many successful GIS projects is access to reliable address information, providing a consistent locational context for a variety of phenomena. One such address resource is OpenAddresses, a collection of authoritative address data sources. The address data are ‘open and free to use’ and made available under both attribution and share-alike (ODbl) licences. Although not yet a global resource, for those countries where address information is available, the data sets may be downloaded as a .zip file (.csv and GDAL .vrt files).

OpenAddresses - global coverage

OpenAddresses – global coverage

Anyone interested in contributing an address dataset to the project can either submit a request to have the data added or submit the data themselves to the repository on Github.

Capturing the Great Indoors with Tango

June 27, 2016 Leave a comment

With the recent announcement of the first Tango-enabled smart phone, Google have taken a big step towards providing a crowd-sourced, indoor mapping solution. The phone’s inbuilt sensors and cameras capture the dimensions of a location and everything inside it, including the furniture. Once captured, all that internal detail becomes a potential back drop for a variety of augmented and virtual reality applications, including interior design and construction, shopping, education and gaming.

Although the data files collected are stored on each phone, Google hopes users will share their Tango data. Perhaps most appealing for Google, although not yet confirmed, the internal data collected and shared by Tango users will provide another platform for expanding their custom advertising and services.

As with other forms of location-based data, there are privacy implications to consider; it’s no longer just where you are or have been, that’s being shared, it is potentially detailed information about your home, your visits to other locations and what you did and saw there. Just how far people will be prepared to trade this new source of location data for services remains to be seen, but given the success of Google Maps and the increasing demand for better internal location information, Tango could help transform the indoor mapping scene.

 

DataPortals.org: A Global Catalogue of Public Domain Data Portals

May 17, 2016 1 comment

The DataPortals.org site, hosted by the Open Knowledge International organisation in conjunction with the LOD2 project, provides a comprehensive repository of over 500 open data portals. The registered portals, published by local, regional and national governments, international organisations and a number of Non Government Organisations (NGOs), provide access to a variety of spatial data sources including administrative boundaries, land use, economic activity and environmental indicators.

DataPortals_org

All data sets referenced by the DataPortals catalogue, including those that form part of a database collection, are published under the Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication & Licence. The data sets are available to download in a variety of formats including .xls, JSON/GEOJSON and shapefile.

 

 

LIDAR Point Cloud Published as Open Data

April 5, 2016 1 comment

The UK Government’s Department for Environment, Food  and Rural Affairs (Defra), recently announced the release of a LIDAR point cloud, the raw data used to generate a number of digital terrain models (DTMs) that were released last year. In addition to providing terrain models for flood modelling and coastline management, the LIDAR data have also been revealing much about long-buried Roman roads and buildings, such as the Vindolanda fort just south of Hadrian’s Wall in northern England.

Vindolanda Roman Fort. Courtesy of the Environment Agency and Defra

Environment Agency/Defra LIDAR data

The point cloud data have been released as part of the #OpenDefra project, which aims to make 8,000 datasets publicly available by mid 2016. The first release of point cloud data contains over 16,000 km 2 of survey data and is available to download from:

http://environment.data.gov.uk/ds/survey/#/survey

The data are licensed under version 3.0 of the Open Government Licence.