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Location, Privacy and Google

September 10, 2018 1 comment

Recent revelations about Google’s continued tracking of personal location information despite the Location History setting being disabled have been widely reported (Business Insider, The Guardian). Google responded robustly, acknowledging incidental location information was also collected under other application settings (specifically Web and App Activity) but insisting they provided clear guidelines on what the various settings entailed. Many observers and users of Google services remain unimpressed by what appears at be the rather insidious tracking of location information. Disabling Location History should mean NO location information is tracked regardless of which Google service was used.

Having just reread their Privacy Policy, Google does make it clear that location information is tracked through a variety of other sources, including public data, business and marketing. The Location History setting means location information is saved to a Google account timeline – if that’s what it means, then perhaps the setting should be Save Location History to Timeline.

All of this leads into a more general discussion on privacy; what do we assume privacy means, what do we expect to remain private and what information about us are we prepared to be in the public domain. I typed define: privacy into Google search and the response was … ‘a state in which one is not observed or disturbed by other people‘. Clearly this is not the baseline for Google’s policy and perhaps another example where some rewording of the policy headline would help clarify exactly what a user of Google’s services can expect. Maybe Information Collection and Reuse Policy would be more transparent so there is no misunderstanding, no expectation of privacy and users make informed decision at to what personal information they are prepared to handover in exchange for access to online services.

 

 

 

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Categories: Public Domain Data

Ordnance Survey GB to provide OS MasterMap data for free.

June 19, 2018 1 comment

The UK government announced last week that key parts of the OS MasterMap dataset (OSMM) are to be made available free of charge (see full announcement from OS). The following two datasets are due to be released under the Open Government licence (OGL) agreement:

  • OS MasterMap Topography Layer property extents
  • OSMM Topography Layer TOIDs (TOpographic IDentifiers), built into the features in the OS OpenMap-Local dataset.

In addition, a number of datasets will be made available (through an API) for free, up to a threshold, including:

  • OS MasterMap Topography Layer, including building heights and functional sites
  • OS MasterMap Greenspace Layer
  • OS MasterMap Highways Network
  • OS MasterMap Water Network Layer
  • OS Detailed Path Network

The announcement didn’t included any information on what the threshold for free access was, but no doubt details will start to filter out shortly as organisations start making use of these new data assets.

General Data Protection Regulation comes to the EU … and it covers location.

April 23, 2018 1 comment

Legislation protection typically lags behind technological innovation until a clearer picture of how a particular technology is used and abused emerges. The issues associated with personal location data privacy and the often unintentional disclosure of personal and sensitive information, are subjects we have discussed many times before on Spatial Reserves (Always On: The analysts are watchingPrivacy concerns from fitness maps and apps).  However, things are set to change in the European Union (EU) with the introduction of new legislation covering how personal location information is collected, used and stored.

On 25th May 2018, General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will come into effect in the EU, replacing an earlier data privacy directive introduced in 1995. Aimed at protecting the personal data of all EU citizens, GDPR establishes new safeguards to minimise data breaches and misuse. It introduces a number of Data Subject Rights including right of access, right to be forgotten and privacy by design. Although such regulatory initiatives are often associated with the data collecting activities of larger companies and organisations and the type of data they collect, such as those in the financial and marketing sectors, GDPR extends the definition of personal data in Article 4 (1) to include:

‘… any information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person (‘data subject’); an identifiable natural person is one who can be identified, directly or indirectly, in particular by reference to an identifier such as a name, an identification number, location data, an online identifier or to one or more factors specific to the physical, physiological, genetic, mental, economic, cultural or social identity of that natural person

This legislative acknowledgement recognises location as an equally important component of personal information and an indicator of what GDPR defines as sensitive traits (political affiliation, religious beliefs and so on). Companies, organisations and institutions in the EU will be required to ask permission to use personal location information, be transparent about the use of this information and delete it if requested to do so.

 

 

Review of the Spatial Reserves Exercises

September 26, 2017 Leave a comment

We’re currently reviewing the exercises that were developed to illustrate some of the issues discussed in the GIS Guide to Public Domain Data publication and here on the Spatial Reserves blog, with the intention of releasing an updated set of exercises next year. The proposed style and format of the updated exercises is the subject of my dissertation as part of a M.Sc. in Digital Education at the University of Edinburgh.

Here’s where you can help …  I’m looking for volunteers to review a presentation on two exercises and complete four short questionnaires. This should only take 10-15 minutes of your time.

The study is available at Digital Education – Multi-media study

Thanks in advance,

Jill C.

 

Latitude Mark II: All change and no change

April 18, 2017 2 comments

A recent article on BusinessInsider reported the re-launch of Google’s location sharing feature as an update to Google Maps. Originally available as Google Latitude, the first version prompted a report highlighting the risks of inadvertently sharing personal location information. Although the location sharing options seem similar second time around, the focus seems to be on the benefits of sharing this type of information and as the article notes, although the privacy concerns haven’t away, they are a footnote rather than the headline.

What has changed in the intervening years appears to be the perceptions about sharing personal location information. Is this because consumers of such services heeded the warnings and shared with discretion so fears were unfounded, or because the risks were not as great as originally thought? Other location sharing applications, such as Glympse and Swarm, stayed the course and developed their niche products away from the spotlight that tends to focus on Google. Have these services paved the way for Google to try again? Whatever the reason, Google is confident enough of a favourable reception to re-release their location sharing technology as part of their flagship application.

 

Lasers: The future of data capture and transmission?

December 12, 2016 Leave a comment

Over the last four years we have discussed some of the many challenges posed by the volume of data now available online – issues of quality, determining provenance, privacy, identifying the most appropriate source for particular requirements and so on. Being overwhelmed by the choice of data available or not always knowing what resources are available or where to start looking have been common responses from geospatial students and practitioners alike.

A recent report from the BBC on laser technology highlighted some current and future applications that have or will transform geospatial data capture, including the use of LiDAR and ultra precise atom interferometers that could be used to develop alternate navigation systems that do not rely on GPS. The article also discusses the inherent limitations of our current electronics-based computing infrastructure and the potential of silicon photonics, firing lasers down optical fibres, to help meet the demand for instant or near-instant access to data in the Internet-of-Everything world. If many feel overwhelmed now by the volumes of data available, what will technologies like silicon photonics mean for data practitioners in the future? Just because data may be available at unprecedented speeds and accessed more easily, that alone doesn’t guarantee the quality of the data will be any better or negate current concerns with respect to issues such as locational privacy. A critical understanding of these issues will be even more important if we are to make the most of these advances in digital data capture and transmission.

Public Domain Data Resources Page from Esri Press

October 3, 2016 Leave a comment

Esri Press have now published a new resources page to compliment The GIS Guide to Public Domain Data, cataloguing a list of blog posts from Spatial Reserves that update and augment many of the themes discussed in the book.

sr_resources

The resources site also provides information on accessing the hands-on exercises that accompany the book. The exercises provide an opportunity for novice and experienced data users alike to work through some of the issues discussed in the book.