Archive

Posts Tagged ‘cars’

Meeting the challenge of up-to-the-minute maps

November 3, 2014 Leave a comment

A few weeks ago we wrote about autonomous cars and some of the associated location data privacy issues that this new type of transport raised. In a related article in Automotive News, the challenge of collecting and maintaining the highly accurate map data that would be required to support these vehicles and provide the locational context for the various data sources collected by in-car sensors was also discussed. As the report author commented, ‘History’s most intrepid explorers were often at the mercy of their maps. The self-driving cars of the future won’t be any different.

Jim Keller (Chief Engineer, Honda R&D Americas Inc.) has acknowledged that mapping is going to be critical to the success of the autonomous car and he considers the relationship between map makers and car manufacturers as both vital and symbiotic. He argues that data collected by the cars will augment the data available from more traditional sources and data available from those more traditional sources will in turn help the car manufacturers.

While this suggests a new location data collecting dynamic – crowd-sourcing meets Street View, with cars altruistically recording and sharing the data they collect – it also highlights some of the challenges ahead. These cars have the potential to provide unprecedented volumes of detailed road network data but for that data to be useful, they have to be accurate, current and consistent with the standards adopted by other map data providers to ensure integration with existing data sets, reliability and ultimately safe driving for all road users.

 

Advertisements

Autonomous cars and location data privacy

September 22, 2014 2 comments

Location data privacy issues continue to challenge both the providers and consumers of location based services. With news last week that Audi has become the first car maker to obtain a permit from the state of California to test autonomous or self-driving cars on public roads, the prospect of so-called robot cars on the roads and highways gets ever closer. This will not only herald a new age in car usage and traffic management, but there will also be some far reaching implications for the collection and use of personal location data. The recording and archiving of navigation histories, monitoring individual driving behaviour, potential links to social media and other online accounts, and the insatiable desire from advertising companies to know as much as they can about where we are going to and what we do when we get there, exposes a minefield of location data privacy issues (What If Your Autonomous Car Keeps Routing You Past Krispy Kreme?). As one motor industry VP of marketing commented at CES earlier in the year, ‘We have GPS in your car, so we know what you’re doing”.

 

US government research into in-car location services has already prompted a call for location data privacy legislation. The Location Privacy Protection Act, updated and reintroduced this year, would require all companies who provide such location based services to obtain explicit permission from their customers before collecting and reusing their personal location data. If passed the bill would also require companies to publicly disclose how the location data is being used.

Should traffic management and law enforcement authorities have access to an individual’s location data while they are on the road? Would the fear of being ‘caught’ violating road and traffic regulations make us more responsible drivers and would the prospect of safer car operation and a reduction in accidents due to the extra surveillance be sufficient to persuade us to relinquish some control over our personal location data? It will be interesting to see what the response to these data privacy issues will be when self-drive cars finally hit the roads.