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Posts Tagged ‘coastal’

The Coastal Atlas from the Maryland Department of Natural Resources

February 5, 2018 1 comment

The Maryland Coastal Atlas serves up ocean use and resource data, coastal hazard and shoreline data, and near-shore and estuarine data.  The purpose of the atlas is to make coastal related geospatial datasets available to agencies, researchers, and the general public for viewing and for performing basic overlays.  Tools are being added to make the atlas more versatile for users to do analysis and to help simplify or select data important for different users’ needs. The list of layers is extensive; at least 100 items are included.  But equally impressive is its ability to add dozens more layers from the MDiMapD database on such themes as agriculture, housing, demographics, hydrology, and much more.

The Atlas uses the Esri Web App Builder for its interactive map capabilities.  One of my favorite things about the atlas is the user’s ability to add data to the web interface from ArcGIS Online, a URL, or a file of the user’s own creation.  The site features unexpected helpful touches such as palette of drawing tools that makes the atlas a rich teaching tool, and transects that can be drawn in the map to analyze such things as erosion rates.

A few enhancements on the site could be done to make it more useful, such as an expansion of the fairly limited query tool and an explanation of how it can be used.  I was puzzled how to close the transect results once I had created one, but this and other user interface questions were small; overall, the interface was intuitive.  The Maryland Coastal Atlas provides an excellent addition to the other portals we have written about in this region, such as the Maryland iMap Data Catalog We wrote about the state of Maryland’s GIS portal in the past, and the selected other data portals for the Chesapeake Bay.

The atlas uses the map services available from the Maryland GIS Portal and the iMap Open Data Catalog that we reviewed above.  To obtain the data, go to the Maryland Data Catalog to download the data or get the API to use in an online mapping application.  All of the Maryland Coastal Hazard datasets on the atlas are available through the data catalog but not all are downloadable.  Here is an example of a dataset on the atlas shown in the iMap Data Catalog with the Download and API function available on the listing.  Every layer is a REST service hosted by Maryland iMap, managed by the Geographical Information Office (GIO) and the state IT group (DOIT).

mdcoastal

The Coastal Atlas from the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

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Crowd sourcing coastal water navigational data

December 22, 2014 Leave a comment

We’ve written a number of posts over the last couple of years on crowd sourced data collection initiatives, all of which have been land-based or involved aerial data (for example, UAV Imagery). The TeamSurv project takes crowd sourced data collection out to sea, enlisting the help of mariners to produce better maps and charts of coastal waters, where the amount of detailed survey data in many countries is low. Project participants will either receive a data logger to use with their existing equipment or be able to load data directly from their own navigation systems.

The data collected from a variety of volunteer vessels include bathymetry, surface currents, sea surface temperature and wind data. Once processed the marine GIS data sets are to be made available to any organisation or authority with an interest in hydrographic data (chart publishers, oceanographers and so on).  The charts are available to download from the TeamSurv web site in shapefile format, and the site promises that other formats will be supported soon.

Unfortunately the data are not being made available in the public domain. The conditions of use include the charts are for personal use only and they may not be distributed or reproduced for commercial or non-commercial purposes without written consent. Although this seems contrary to the ethos of crowd sourcing, given the amount of post-collection cleaning and correction the data are subject to, it is perhaps understandable that some restrictions on their use should be imposed. Is it better to have unrestricted access to a lot of data of variable quality, or are some restrictions a price worth paying if the quality of the data can be guaranteed?

 

 

European Atlas of the Seas

June 2, 2014 1 comment

The European Atlas of the Seas, launched in 2011, provides open access to a variety of global and European maritime and geographical datasets covering eight main themes:

  • Geography
  • Nature – bathing water quality, protected areas
  • Tourism – museums, aquariums
  • Security and safety – major oil spills, accident density
  • People and employment – coastal population, employment in the fishing industry
  • Transport and energy – shipping for goods and passenger transport.
  • Governance and European policies – fisheries local action groups (FLAGs), regional advisory councils (RACs)
  • Fisheries and aquaculture – fishing quotas, state of fish stocks, fish farms

EU_AtlasOfSeas

The Atlas is continually updated with revised and additional datasets provided by the contributing departments, agencies and international organisations including UNESCO, FAO, USDA FSA, USGS, NOAA, Esri and IHQ. Some of the datasets are available to download in shapefile and KML format, and the accompanying metadata provide details on the data sources referenced.