Archive

Posts Tagged ‘return on investment’

Evaluating GIS costs and benefits

August 28, 2017 1 comment

One of the themes in our book and this blog is to carefully evaluate the costs and benefits of geospatial data.  This should be considered if you are a consumer of data, and are debating whether to purchase data that may be “cleaned up”, thereby saving you time, or to download a free “pre-processed” version of that data, which saves you up-front money but may require quite a few hours or your time or your staff’s time.  However, a data producing organization should also evaluate costs and benefits when they decide how to serve it, and if and how to charge for it.

Chapter 4 of our book delves into these questions: “What is the true cost and value of spatial data?  How can the cost and value of spatial data be measured?  How do the policies determining cost and access ultimately affect the availability, quality, and use of spatial data?”

Other resources might be helpful:  One of my favorite pieces is this essay from Geospatial World on the Economic Value of Geospatial Data–The Great Enabler as is this economic studies for GIS operations document from NSGIC.  A series of 10 case studies are summarized in an e-book from Esri entitled Return on Investment, and here is the results of research of 82 cost-benefit assessments across multiple countries.  One of my favorite “benefits from GIS implementation” pieces is this recent brief but pointed document from Ozaukee County.  A dated but still solid chapter on this topic from Obermeyer is here, with a case study in Ghana here.  The economic impact infographic that has probably received the most attention is from Oxera’s well-done “Economic impact of Geo Services” study.

oxera

The top of the “Economic Impact of Geo Services” infographic from Oxera’s study.

What are your thoughts?  Should organizations still be charging for data in the 21st Century?  Should all geospatial data be open for anyone to use?  How should organizations pay for the creation and curation of geospatial data as the audience and uses for that data continue to expand?  Once geospatial data services are online, how can they best be updated and curated?

Advertisements