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Location Tracking: Getting Under The Skin

March 11, 2019 Leave a comment

We’ve written many times over the last few years about the varying ways devices can track our location, with or without our explicit consent. In most cases our tracks are determined by our interaction with and/or our adjacency to a tracking device; the boundaries of our location privacy determined by the range and sophistication of those devices and to some extent our application preferences. To stop the location tracking, all we needed to do was change the settings, turn off the device or leave it at home and avoid the cameras. However, recent advances in microchip technology look set to change the boundaries of location tracking once more.

Microchip implants have been around for over 20 years, from early experiments proving RFID (radio frequency identification) implants could be used to open doors and turn on lights, to pet and patient microchips for storing identification and medical information. The next generation of microchips will see the inclusion of location tracking technology. Within the last year some new microchips have been introduced that can be read from a distance, are connected to the internet and GPS-enabled. With an embedded GPS-enabled microchip, we become the tracking device.

One company involved in this area, Three Square Market (32M), have been working on a voice-activated, body-heat-powered chip that will monitor an individual’s vital signs and track their location via GPS. With plans to test the new chips this year, 32M are focussing initially on dementia patients. With all such new technology, there always the potential to misuse and abuse the information collected, and as with the introduction of other tracking devices such as drones, the legislation governing the use of GPS-enable microchips lags behind. As Weiss notes (2018) ‘… how will lawmakers and experts in security and tech react when required to define consent for a patient with advanced dementia?

With embedded microchip devices that can transmit and receive location and other information over an increasingly wide area, can there be any guarantees that the individual hosting the device will have complete control over who has access to their location information?