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Posts Tagged ‘surveying’

Harmonising UAS Regulations and Standards: Article Review

October 23, 2016 Leave a comment

A recent article in GIM International about harmonising UAS (Unmanned Aerial Systems, or UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles), or “Drone” technologies) regulations and standards is definitely worth reading, providing an excellent summary of this rapidly evolving sector of the geospatial industry.  The article, beginning on page 6, is in a special issue of GIM International dedicated exclusively to UAS, available here.  Peter van Blyenburgh summarizes developments in regulations and standardization in Europe, the USA, Japan, and China, and then provides some down-to-earth advice for companies who are seeing the potential for profits only but may not see the bigger picture about liability, regulations, and safety.  The GIM issue also includes articles about integrating UAS and multibeam echosounder data, multispectral and thermal sensors on UAVs, UAS applications in agriculture, and the article “Airborne laser scanning” provides an excellent introduction to the two main platforms:  fixed-wing and rotorcraft.

If I am reading the “tea leaves” correctly, in the world of education, just about every GIS program offered at a technical college and university will include at least one course in UAS technology and data by this time next year.  And I would expect that a whole host of online MOOCs and other courses will appear from universities, companies, and GIS organizations to help people effectively use these new tools and technologies.  I attended, for example, a multi-hour course at the recent Geo’Ed community college GIS conference on this topic.  This reinforced my opinion that while online courses and programs will be helpful, the face-to-face component, actually working with the software and hardware, is particularly useful when working with UAS:  There is no perfect substitute for rolling up one’s sleeves and working with these devices.

As publishing director Durk Haarsma states in his editorial for this special issue, UASs are disruptive technologies, because they are influencing so many geospatial fields and subfields, such as cadastral surveying, cultural heritage, and precision agriculture, just to name a few.  Because UAS influence how people in an increasing number of professions map and model the world, interpreting the data from those UAS is central to our book and this blog–understanding your data, and how they are obtained, is more critical than ever.

uaslaunch

Launching a fixed wing UAV at the Geo’Ed conference, Louisville Technical College, Kentucky. Photograph by Joseph Kerski.  Video here and analyzing thermal imagery here.

The National Geodetic Survey Data Explorer and Citizen Science

June 29, 2015 1 comment

The National Geodetic Survey (NGS) Data Explorer is a web mapping application, launched by the Survey in 2012, allowing users to view geodetic control data across the USA and its territories.  To use, zoom in on the map on a location of interest, and select “plot marks”.  You will see all of the control marks in that vicinity, including CORS, GPS sites, horizonal control markers, and vertical control markers.  Furthermore, the NGS datasheet documentation for each control mark is accessible from the same mapping interface, including the latitude, longitude, elevation, position source, complete description of the physical marker, the history of the marker, the condition of the marker, and other information.

The mapping site was launched in 2012 and has seen improvements since then.  I found it easy to use, and very useful. The only thing I could not find that would be extremely helpful is the ability to export from the map and data set to a variety of formats–a geodatabase would be nice, or at the very least, a spreadsheet.  I also could not find how I could “select” points that I was interested in, aside from clicking on each one on the map.

Our book discusses the impact of citizen science efforts on geospatial data.  On this note, the NGS also runs a “GPS on Bench Marks” effort, a citizen science program for finding and reporting on the conditions of NGS benchmarks.  By providing GPS on bench marks today, people can help NGS improve the next hybrid geoid model, increasing access to the North American Vertical Datum of 1988, and enabling conversions to the new vertical datum in 2022.  Participating could also help the local surveying community know about nearby marks by improving scaled horizontal positions and updating the mark condition or description by submitting a mark recovery.  A web map in ArcGIS Online is here.

If you are interested in other activities and services from the National Geodetic Survey, see the recent excellent summary in The American Surveyor.  This includes guidelines for using post-processing GPS technology to establish accurate ellipsoid heights and orthometric heights, the new North American Vertical Datum that will be released in 2022, and updates on the GEOCON datum transformation tools.

National Geodetic Survey Data Explorer

National Geodetic Survey Data Explorer.